Do students really need 4G?

By Paul Silli

A lot of students have asked me what is 4G.

The new 4G cell phones were developed from previous technologies. It started with the 1G or First Generation phones that were invented in the 1980s. They were the size of a shoe box and weighed about 50 lbs. The older models really were large and heavy. Reception also was poor due to a lack of tower signal support — but owning a phone where you could call someone from anywhere was exciting to consumers.

The 2G – Second Generation phones offered users the ability to take pictures with a built-in camera and send text messages. They also were smaller devices and a bit easier to use.

As for the streamlined 3G – Third Generation phones they were created to hold large file data. This is so you can keep your movie  clips, images, social network accounts, texts and emails within your phone plan. Features like accessing the Internet are much more available.

Today, your 4G – Fourth Generation “Smartphones” can produce extremely fast network uploads/downloads of data. The operating software and Internet access can hold huge amounts of files through increased memory. The International Telecommunication Union defines 4G as: “The ability to download data at speeds of 1 gigabit per second.”

However, students do not need large memory capacity 4G phones. Most people do not fully use the data plans — and 4G service is expensive. It can cost you anywhere from $85 to $120+ per month.

If you are patient, 4G will reduce in price as it is replaced by something new in the market.

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One Response to “Do students really need 4G?”

  1. Karine Says:

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